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Correction Mechanism for Ink Jet Typewriters

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000053129D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-12
Document File: 4 page(s) / 99K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Edds, KE: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

In ink jet typewriters it is desirable to employ some means for making corrections on a print-receiving medium. Two such techniques are illustrated schematically in this article.

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Correction Mechanism for Ink Jet Typewriters

In ink jet typewriters it is desirable to employ some means for making corrections on a print-receiving medium. Two such techniques are illustrated schematically in this article.

Referring first to Fig. 1, a typical ink jet printer or typewriter 10 is comprised of a carrier 11 including a drop generator 12 connected through tubing or the like 13 to a source of ink. Mounted on the carrier are the conventional charge electrodes 14 and spaced-apart deflection electrodes 15, the former electrodes serving to charge predetermined drops emanating from the drop generator 12 while the latter deflection electrodes 15 serve to deflect selected ink drops in accordance with the charge placed thereon so as to effect the printing of characters and the like 16 on a print-receiving medium 17 carried by a platen 18. The carrier 11 moves in the direction of the arrows 11a and 11b, effecting a sweeping motion along a print line parallel to the axis of the platen 18, while the stream of ink droplets scans vertically. A carrier pointer 19 may be employed to show the operator the position of the next printed character.

If the printer is operator-controlled, a conventional keyboard and the like 20 may be coupled through suitable machine logic 21 and power supply 22 to a servo motor or the like 23. The position of the carrier at any point in time is known either by an emitter wheel associated with the servo motor 23 or due to a grating 24 and associated grating detector 25. The grating detector is connected to the machine logic 21 so that characters and the like may be printed upon the paper 17 at the desired print point.

The operator has correction capability by way of the keyboard 20. In this connection, a reservoir 30 (see Fig. 1 and Figs. 2A, 2B) holding a supply of correction or cover up fluid 31 may be mounted on the carrier 11. At the base portion of the reservoir is a plunger 32 having a dauber or the like 33 at one extended end thereof which is connected through appropriate linkage 34 as to a solenoid 35. Because of the grating 24 and associated grating detector 25, the machine logic in conjunction with the associated memory will permit proper position...