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Browse Prior Art Database

Deflection Servo Technique for Ink Jet Printers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000053130D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-12
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Neville, MH: AUTHOR

Abstract

Interactive printers, such as an ink jet typewriter, must back up over the previously printed-upon medium so that they may have enough time to accelerate to the proper velocity before resuming printing. This is an excellent opportunity to deflect a limited number of drops to insure that the deflection height (the height of the deflected drop in a continuous or Sweet-type ink jet printer) remains within the predetermined and preset parameters.

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Deflection Servo Technique for Ink Jet Printers

Interactive printers, such as an ink jet typewriter, must back up over the previously printed-upon medium so that they may have enough time to accelerate to the proper velocity before resuming printing. This is an excellent opportunity to deflect a limited number of drops to insure that the deflection height (the height of the deflected drop in a continuous or Sweet-type ink jet printer) remains within the predetermined and preset parameters.

Employing a sensor which can sense a small number of drops, such as the optical deflection sensor described in U.S. Patent 4,136,345, a servo operation may be performed, which is not visible to the operator, by deflecting drops onto the paper in a spot upon which printing has already occurred.

Certain characters, for example, lend themselves to such a servoing technique. For example, the highly magnified letter "T" shown in the drawing has three such areas 10, 11 and 12 which may serve as a deflection height deposition area for a limited number of drops. In this connection, all the machine has to have is sufficient memory to remember the position of the last appropriate character and, if the carrier backs up to that position, a servo may be performed. By continuously updating the last available servo position, servos may be available with a high enough frequency to make servoing at the right or left frame of the machine unnecessary. However, of course, when extended servoing is...