Browse Prior Art Database

Fast Transmission of Data With Quick Overrun Recovery

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000053143D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-12
Document File: 2 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Capowski, S: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In contemporary systems for transmission of discrete data blocks (of packets, doublewords, words, bytes, etc.), wherein the receiver must buffer the data for transmission to another receiver, customary practice is to separate successive blocks by a "guard" interval of sufficient duration to permit the receiver to alert the sender to the availability of sufficient buffer capacity at the receiver for storage of the next block. This wasteful time separation between successive blocks (and potentially wasteful use of buffer resources at the receiver) can be eliminated by means of the scheme described below.

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Fast Transmission of Data With Quick Overrun Recovery

In contemporary systems for transmission of discrete data blocks (of packets, doublewords, words, bytes, etc.), wherein the receiver must buffer the data for transmission to another receiver, customary practice is to separate successive blocks by a "guard" interval of sufficient duration to permit the receiver to alert the sender to the availability of sufficient buffer capacity at the receiver for storage of the next block. This wasteful time separation between successive blocks (and potentially wasteful use of buffer resources at the receiver) can be eliminated by means of the scheme described below.

In this scheme data blocks are sent contiguously in time and implicitly accepted by the receiver so long as the latter has sufficient buffer capacity. When a buffer shortage occurs, the receiver rejects further incoming data and returns a "suspend and retry" indication which dynamically conditions the sender to retransmit the unaccepted data when the shortage ends. At such times the receiver is adapted to ignore any "in-transit" data which may arrive between the time of its suspend and retry signal and the arrival of the retransmitted data.

The drawing shows a transmitter X adapted for sending a potentially continuous stream of data blocks to a receiver R, via transfer bus 1, without any time separation between successive blocks. Each transmitted block is accompanied by a tag signal on line 2 for clocking reception of that block, and possibly for distinguishing the type of i...