Browse Prior Art Database

Revival of Fatigued Photoconductors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000053175D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-12
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Belanson, RD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Organic photoconductors of interest in electrophotographic applications are typically characterized by low conductivities in the dark, so that if charges are internally built up (e.g., due to trapping of holes in impurity sites), these internal charges will usually take long (e.g., hours or days) to dissipate. Thus, if charges are slowly built up in the photoconductor, the electrical properties of this photoconductor will slowly change, causing undesirable drifts in the operating conditions of the device which utilizes the photoconductor. Such ``fatigued'' photoconductors (i.e., with large amounts of internally trapped charges) can be recovered (or revived) to their full sensitivity by exposure to light of suitable spectral content at no applied electric field.

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Revival of Fatigued Photoconductors

Organic photoconductors of interest in electrophotographic applications are typically characterized by low conductivities in the dark, so that if charges are internally built up (e.g., due to trapping of holes in impurity sites), these internal charges will usually take long (e.g., hours or days) to dissipate. Thus, if charges are slowly built up in the photoconductor, the electrical properties of this photoconductor will slowly change, causing undesirable drifts in the operating conditions of the device which utilizes the photoconductor. Such ``fatigued'' photoconductors (i.e., with large amounts of internally trapped charges) can be recovered (or revived) to their full sensitivity by exposure to light of suitable spectral content at no applied electric field.

To illustrate the idea of revival of fatigued photoconductors, we choose two specific examples: (a) a photoconductor consisting of a charge generation layer (CGL) of 0.1 mu m thick chlorodiane blue dye that is solution-coated onto aluminized MYLAR*, and overcoated with a charge transport layer (CTL) of 20 mu m thick DEH (diethyl amino benzaldyhyde diphenyl hydrazone) doped polycarbonate; (b) same as in (a) except the CGL is 1 mu m thick dispersion- coated methyl squarylium particles in a binder.

To fatigue one of these photoconductors, we use red light to produce carriers in the CGL in an external applied field, of strength typically 200,000 V/cm. The red light is not ab...