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All-Points-Addressable Printing Improvement

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000059605D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Baker, GN: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A technique is described whereby the quality of print characters of matrix printers is enhanced through the use of an extra print wire so as to provide an overprint condition between printed lines. This concept is particularly applicable in all-points-addressable (APA) printing by eliminating white streaks which occur between adjacent printed lines. When printing APA images on a matrix printer, paper spacing tolerances often result in a gap occurring between the printed lines, which when observed appears as a white streak running across the printed images. Streak variations as small as .005" significantly detract from the quality of the printed images. The technique described herein uses a ninth print wire to provide an overlap, thereby eliminating the line gap appearing as a white streak on the paper.

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All-Points-Addressable Printing Improvement

A technique is described whereby the quality of print characters of matrix printers is enhanced through the use of an extra print wire so as to provide an overprint condition between printed lines. This concept is particularly applicable in all-points-addressable (APA) printing by eliminating white streaks which occur between adjacent printed lines. When printing APA images on a matrix printer, paper spacing tolerances often result in a gap occurring between the printed lines, which when observed appears as a white streak running across the printed images. Streak variations as small as .005" significantly detract from the quality of the printed images. The technique described herein uses a ninth print wire to provide an overlap, thereby eliminating the line gap appearing as a white streak on the paper. Many matrix printers utilize eight print wires to correspond to eight bit bytes of transferred data, where each byte is a dot image of a vertical column eight dots high. A series of the print columns printed side by side across a page constitutes a line of printing. This line shows up as a slice of a picture approximately 1/8" high. To eliminate the white streak which appears between the lines, it is proposed to print eight high dots utilizing print wires 2 to 9, as shown in the figure. During the first line of printing, wire #1 is not used. Data for the second line is then passed to the printer. As the second line is pri...