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Parallel Processor Architecture to Control Multiple Independent Telecommunications Switching Nodes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000059612D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chang, LL: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This article describes a parallel processor architecture to control multiple independent telecommunications switching nodes which permits the use of many smaller processors to do the job that once required a larger, more expensive computer. A large telecommunications switching system may be architectured in varying degrees of centralized dependency versus distributed autonomy. Because of the growing dispersion of population centers and the advances in transmission technology, many systems are distributing switching capacity in smaller nodes attached to a central host. Less sophisticated switching nodes may rely on the host system for much of the control of a connection. A more sophisticated node is able to establish calls within itself and communicate call related data to the host on an independent data link.

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Parallel Processor Architecture to Control Multiple Independent Telecommunications Switching Nodes

This article describes a parallel processor architecture to control multiple independent telecommunications switching nodes which permits the use of many smaller processors to do the job that once required a larger, more expensive computer. A large telecommunications switching system may be architectured in varying degrees of centralized dependency versus distributed autonomy. Because of the growing dispersion of population centers and the advances in transmission technology, many systems are distributing switching capacity in smaller nodes attached to a central host. Less sophisticated switching nodes may rely on the host system for much of the control of a connection. A more sophisticated node is able to establish calls within itself and communicate call related data to the host on an independent data link. Beyond this, a node takes on the appearance of a small central switching office, offering total autonomy from the host except for internodal connections, a full range of custom calling features to the nodal subscribers, and the ability to relate port information to the host for implementation of system-wide custom- calling features. To achieve this degree of common intelligence, the host becomes increasingly more message- processing oriented. In large multi-node systems, the host becomes a central processing facility handling all internodal call routing and feature transfers. The parallel processors and message distribution system is illustrated in the drawing. A high volume of independent message traffic to the central processor may require a large processor or, due to the independent nature of each message, may be handled by a group of identical parallel processors A each handling the message...