Browse Prior Art Database

Robotic System Tactile-Sensing Gripper End-Of-Arm-Tooling

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000059619D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Deringer, TJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a robotic system tactile-sensing gripper end- of-arm-tooling (EOAT) for picking and placing and/or removing electronic modules on printed circuit (PC) boards. Current robotic grippers have a tendency to disturb the placement of an electronic module when withdrawing. The device disclosed herein enables the pins embedded in a PC board to hold the module while the EOAT withdraws laterally. Referring to Fig. 1, a four-bar parallel- acting gripper can pick up a prepositioned magazine-fed module. There is enough surface above the pin-frame on the ends to allow the two tactile-sensing gripper plates A to engage module body B with perfect pin alignment (all pins must be straight and square) to the PC board holes.

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Robotic System Tactile-Sensing Gripper End-Of-Arm-Tooling

This article describes a robotic system tactile-sensing gripper end- of-arm- tooling (EOAT) for picking and placing and/or removing electronic modules on printed circuit (PC) boards. Current robotic grippers have a tendency to disturb the placement of an electronic module when withdrawing. The device disclosed herein enables the pins embedded in a PC board to hold the module while the EOAT withdraws laterally. Referring to Fig. 1, a four-bar parallel- acting gripper can pick up a prepositioned magazine-fed module. There is enough surface above the pin-frame on the ends to allow the two tactile-sensing gripper plates A to engage module body B with perfect pin alignment (all pins must be straight and square) to the PC board holes. Further, if the sides of the module are used for grasping surfaces, there is enough surface on each side of the module for two gripper plates to grasp the module body. The module is inserted into position by the robot gripper at C. The problem arises as the gripper plates open to release the module. There is a strong tendency for the module to tilt, tip or come completely out of the PC board during the gripper plates opening and releasing action, as shown in Fig. 1. This problem is overcome by using the (EOAT) electronic module shoe assembly D shown in Fig. 2 to pick up and insert modules into PC boards. The shoe assembly contains a U-shaped channel M which permits it to be slipped...