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Torque Compensator - Ultrasonic Cleaning Rack

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000059648D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ackerman, DB: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes the design of a parts-holding rack used in an ultrasonic cleaning operation that assures complete cleaning of the process part surfaces, including the areas in and around the rack guides and holding fingers. The design prevents the "shadowing effect" that occurs where the parts are clamped to the holding rack or nest and do not get the proper exposure to the cleaning fluids. In a conventional ultrasonic cleaning tank, a source of sound energy is immersed in the cleaning fluid which is energized by an appropriate outside source. The purpose is to produce agitation and bubbles to scrub the surfaces of the immersed parts. The frequency and amplitude of the sonic vibrations are established in part by the volume of the tank, the viscosity of the fluid, the fluid temperature and other parameters.

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Torque Compensator - Ultrasonic Cleaning Rack

This article describes the design of a parts-holding rack used in an ultrasonic cleaning operation that assures complete cleaning of the process part surfaces, including the areas in and around the rack guides and holding fingers. The design prevents the "shadowing effect" that occurs where the parts are clamped to the holding rack or nest and do not get the proper exposure to the cleaning fluids. In a conventional ultrasonic cleaning tank, a source of sound energy is immersed in the cleaning fluid which is energized by an appropriate outside source. The purpose is to produce agitation and bubbles to scrub the surfaces of the immersed parts. The frequency and amplitude of the sonic vibrations are established in part by the volume of the tank, the viscosity of the fluid, the fluid temperature and other parameters. Normally the sound source is placed on the bottom of the tank, and the sound waves travel vertically to the surface of the liquid and are reflected back into the liquid at the surface. This reflected sound energy produces complex waveforms in the cleaning solution. If a reed or tuning fork-type device is placed in the liquid and positioned perpendicular to the cone axis and in the path of the sound waves, parasitic vibrations will be set up in the device. The frequency of the vibrations will be determined by the mass of the device and the fundamental frequency of the sound source. Fig. 1 shows a contemporary...