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Electron Beam Testing of Electronic Packages Using a Continuously Rotating Table

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000059686D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Golladay, SD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In the manufacture of multi-layer ceramic substrates for semiconductors, electron beam testing of the substrates is used to test the substrate interconnections. This technique has deflection range and spot resolution limitations which do not make it viable for one-step inspection of large samples. The method described provides a continuous or sequential rotation of the samples being inspected to overcome these limitations. Systems currently in use typically have a 1-2 mil resolution over 90-100 mm square deflection area. These parameters can only be expanded marginally, so that larger sample sizes cannot be accommodated without some modification to the operating procedures. One method of handling large samples, shown in Fig. 1, is to use a step-and-repeat technique.

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Electron Beam Testing of Electronic Packages Using a Continuously Rotating Table

In the manufacture of multi-layer ceramic substrates for semiconductors, electron beam testing of the substrates is used to test the substrate interconnections. This technique has deflection range and spot resolution limitations which do not make it viable for one-step inspection of large samples. The method described provides a continuous or sequential rotation of the samples being inspected to overcome these limitations. Systems currently in use typically have a 1-2 mil resolution over 90-100 mm square deflection area. These parameters can only be expanded marginally, so that larger sample sizes cannot be accommodated without some modification to the operating procedures. One method of handling large samples, shown in Fig. 1, is to use a step-and-repeat technique. The electron optical center 1 and the maximum deflection field 2 are shown located on an x-y table. The subfields 4 are stepped through various x-y stage locations 3 while being tested. The step-and-repeat method requires a complicated x-y stage with a large open area to accommodate the required flood gun charging. Also, no testing can be performed while the table is stepping to the next subfield, and a large vacuum chamber is required to provide room for the x and y motion. The present technique utilizes rotational motion of the sample during the testing step. The sample center 5 is positioned off-center from the electro...