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Surface-Mounted Component Workboard Holder

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000059688D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gillen, EJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

A workboard holder is provided for securely mounting electrical circuit panels while the panels are being transported through a number of different steps in fabrication. A workboard is placed in a special fixture and pressed down against stops built into the fixture, where the workboard is clamped at the stop position. This action opens a number of springs in the workboards. The panel to be transported is then placed on locating pins provided on the workboard to accurately locate the panel. Releasing the workboard from the clamps in the fixture causes the springs to close and engage the panel to firmly hold the panel for subsequent transportation through fabrication steps such as screening solder paste, placing components on the panel, soldering, cleaning and cutting the cards from the panel at completion of the fabrication.

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Surface-Mounted Component Workboard Holder

A workboard holder is provided for securely mounting electrical circuit panels while the panels are being transported through a number of different steps in fabrication. A workboard is placed in a special fixture and pressed down against stops built into the fixture, where the workboard is clamped at the stop position. This action opens a number of springs in the workboards. The panel to be transported is then placed on locating pins provided on the workboard to accurately locate the panel. Releasing the workboard from the clamps in the fixture causes the springs to close and engage the panel to firmly hold the panel for subsequent transportation through fabrication steps such as screening solder paste, placing components on the panel, soldering, cleaning and cutting the cards from the panel at completion of the fabrication. The springs which hold the panel in place on the workboard are preferably made of 17-7PH stainless steel to withstand temperatures up to 550 degrees Fahrenheit. This is well above the 419 degrees Fahrenheit temperature encountered in vapor phase soldering to which the springs are exposed. The design is inexpensive and has a low profile above the top of the panel to facilitate solder screening. Additionally, the equipment can be adapted to robotic manufacturing.

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