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Relational Data Base System Operator Performance in the Presence of Faults

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000059694D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Haderle, DJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In the prior art, all information about the relational data base (DB) privileges, including the system operator's (SYSOPR) privileges, was recorded in the DB catalog. Whenever an authorization ID wanted to perform SYSOPR functions, such as issuing DB DISPLAY, TRACE, RECOVER, or STOPALL commands, DB Authorization had to retrieve information from the catalog in order to allow or disallow the authorization ID to perform the requested functions. If the catalog was not available due to some reason, such as a damaged catalog, etc., then DB Authorization could not perform its function normally and SYSOPR IDs could not pass the DB authorization check to perform their functions, which needed to be performed in order to know the DB status. This article relates to a method for eliminating the above problem.

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Relational Data Base System Operator Performance in the Presence of Faults

In the prior art, all information about the relational data base (DB) privileges, including the system operator's (SYSOPR) privileges, was recorded in the DB catalog. Whenever an authorization ID wanted to perform SYSOPR functions, such as issuing DB DISPLAY, TRACE, RECOVER, or STOPALL commands, DB Authorization had to retrieve information from the catalog in order to allow or disallow the authorization ID to perform the requested functions. If the catalog was not available due to some reason, such as a damaged catalog, etc., then DB Authorization could not perform its function normally and SYSOPR IDs could not pass the DB authorization check to perform their functions, which needed to be performed in order to know the DB status. This article relates to a method for eliminating the above problem. Suppose a DB installation is permitted to specify two authorization IDs as Super SYSOPRs in the system parameters and use MVS SYSOPRs as defaults. The information about the install defined SYSOPRs (Super SYSOPRs) is not recorded in the catalog. The information is kept in the storage. When an authorization ID issues the DISPLAY, TRACE, RECOVER, or STOPALL command, DB Authorization will compare the authorization ID with the install defined SYSOPR IDs first. If the IDs are equal, the DB allows the authorization ID to perform the requested operation. At this point, DB Authorization does not need to ac...