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Two-Keystroke Ideographic Character Input Method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000059696D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Evey, RJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This invention relates to a method for two-keystroke KANJI character input in which the home row of keys plus the keyboard space bar are operative as a ZIPF law coding pad. The method provides instant learning for the novice operator as well as efficiency for the expert typist. Illustratively, suppose a multiple character keyboard organized in rows and having a space bar is invoked. Suppose, two-stroke codes are assigned to a predetermined number of the most frequently occurring KANJI characters constituting, say, 65 percent of the characters in the language. The algorithm includes the following factors: 1. Select n keys from the character-entry keys of a computer-assisted keyboard entry system. 2. Select m other keys from the keyboard. 3. Select the mxn (m times n) most useful ideograms from the language of interest.

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Two-Keystroke Ideographic Character Input Method

This invention relates to a method for two-keystroke KANJI character input in which the home row of keys plus the keyboard space bar are operative as a ZIPF law coding pad. The method provides instant learning for the novice operator as well as efficiency for the expert typist. Illustratively, suppose a multiple character keyboard organized in rows and having a space bar is invoked. Suppose, two-stroke codes are assigned to a predetermined number of the most frequently occurring KANJI characters constituting, say, 65 percent of the characters in the language. The algorithm includes the following factors: 1. Select n keys from the character-entry keys of a computer-assisted keyboard entry system. 2. Select m other keys from the keyboard. 3. Select the mxn (m times n) most useful ideograms from the language of interest. 4. Partition these most useful ideograms into n equally-sized groups of m characters each. 5. Select a method (color, position, embossing, etc.) of associating each of the ideograms from each group with one of the keys from step
2. 6. Inscribe each group using the association method of step 5 on one of the n keys of step 1 so as to be visible and easily distinguishable by the user. 7. By striking first the key from step 1 containing the desired ideogram and then the associated key from step 2, a code for each ideogram can be interpreted by a computer processing capability to perform any combinations o...