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Enclosed Welded Filament Chip Heat Sink

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000059710D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Buller, ML: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The present article describes an improved heat sink for incorporation in modules, which modules are comprised of a substrate on which are mounted semiconductor chips with a cover member sealed thereover. As can be seen in the figure, a substrate 10 is provided on which are mounted a plurality of semiconductor chips 12. A cover member 14 seals the chips on the substrate. Disposed within the cover 14 and attached by welding to the inside of the top portion of the cover are a plurality of conductive brush- like members 16. Each of these brush-like members is formed of a heat- conducting resilient spring tempered stranded wire, which splays outwardly from its point of attachment to the cover. The members 16 are arranged such that each overlies one chip, and each is of sufficient length to resiliently engage its underlying chip.

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Enclosed Welded Filament Chip Heat Sink

The present article describes an improved heat sink for incorporation in modules, which modules are comprised of a substrate on which are mounted semiconductor chips with a cover member sealed thereover. As can be seen in the figure, a substrate 10 is provided on which are mounted a plurality of semiconductor chips 12. A cover member 14 seals the chips on the substrate. Disposed within the cover 14 and attached by welding to the inside of the top portion of the cover are a plurality of conductive brush- like members 16. Each of these brush-like members is formed of a heat- conducting resilient spring tempered stranded wire, which splays outwardly from its point of attachment to the cover. The members 16 are arranged such that each overlies one chip, and each is of sufficient length to resiliently engage its underlying chip. Thus, the brush-like structure acts as a good thermal path from the chip to the cover. A bell-shaped restraining member 17 underlies each of the sets of spring elements. The restraining member is generally cone shaped with the larger end disposed at the end adjacent the chips and in size slightly smaller than the size of the upper surface of the chips. Thermal grease 18 is introduced within the restraining member 17 to increase the thermal conductivity. The restraining member shapes and positions the brush-like members 16 and also contains the thermal grease.

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