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Variable Symbolic Data Substitution in System Messages

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000059767D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Davis, JH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In support of applications, it is necessary to have program and application data within messages. Different languages follow different rules of syntax and usage and must, therefore, have the data placed in messages at different places and in different orders. This article describes a technique of symbolic data substitutions in system messages to support messages in whatever languages are required by the customer and with the data appearing in messages in places appropriate to the syntax of the language. System messages in the Information Management System Application Development Facility (IMSADF) II are generally held in a control section that is specific to a language. Different control sections are picked up to produce messages for different languages.

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Variable Symbolic Data Substitution in System Messages

In support of applications, it is necessary to have program and application data within messages. Different languages follow different rules of syntax and usage and must, therefore, have the data placed in messages at different places and in different orders. This article describes a technique of symbolic data substitutions in system messages to support messages in whatever languages are required by the customer and with the data appearing in messages in places appropriate to the syntax of the language. System messages in the Information Management System Application Development Facility (IMSADF) II are generally held in a control section that is specific to a language. Different control sections are picked up to produce messages for different languages. The messages are defined in English and then translated to other languages that are supported by the product. Symbolic codes are placed in each message in every place where program or application data is to appear. Data is passed to the message building program in a table. The symbolic substitution codes reference entries within the table.

Thus, ?V1 in a message will take the value of the first table entry, ?V3 takes the value of the third table entry, and so on. Up to fifteen table entries are allowed, with entry numbers of 1 through 9 and A through F. There is a special symbolic code of ?V0 which is used for the message number itself. A message in English w...