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Xerographic Photoconductor Grounding Strip

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000059785D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chen, YT: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

A liquid ink is coated onto the edge of a photoconductor belt. This ink includes conductive particles and a solvent which attacks the photoconductor layer. As a result, electrical connection is established to the photoconductor's ground plane metal layer. A xerographic photoconductor belt consists of a flexible plastic substrate, a metal layer, usually aluminum, and one or more photo- active layers containing a binder, for example, polycarbonate. An ink is formulated which contains electrically conductive particles in the form of carbon, graphite or metal flakes, a polycarbonate binder, and a solvent.

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Xerographic Photoconductor Grounding Strip

A liquid ink is coated onto the edge of a photoconductor belt. This ink includes conductive particles and a solvent which attacks the photoconductor layer. As a result, electrical connection is established to the photoconductor's ground plane metal layer. A xerographic photoconductor belt consists of a flexible plastic substrate, a metal layer, usually aluminum, and one or more photo- active layers containing a binder, for example, polycarbonate. An ink is formulated which contains electrically conductive particles in the form of carbon, graphite or metal flakes, a polycarbonate binder, and a solvent. When this ink is coated onto the top of the photoconductor's active layer(s) to form a narrow track or strip around the belt at one edge, the solvent penetrates the photoconductor's active layer(s), causing the particles to complete an electrical circuit to the aluminum ground plane. As this belt operates in a xerographic reproduction device, a metal brush or roller rides on the track, thereby establishing an electrical circuit to the photoconductor's ground plane.

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