Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Pin Identification on Computer Display in Computer-Aided VLSI Design

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000059791D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Arthur, LA: AUTHOR

Abstract

This invention is a program executed in conjunction with computer-aided custom VLSI (very large-scale integrated) design in which the circuit layout is subdivided into macros which are represented as shapes in a data base having attributes associated with them but not displayed when the macro is accessed and displayed on a computer display. The invention selects certain of those attributes from selected shapes for display along with the selected shape. In particular, the invention is used with global wiring, that phase in chip physical design in which the wiring connector points of macros ("pins") are interconnected by wires in an appropriate fashion. Macros are represented on a display by a rectilinear shape, such as a rectangle, or a "T" shape, and the pins are represented as small rectangular shapes along the edge thereof.

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Automatic Pin Identification on Computer Display in Computer-Aided VLSI Design

This invention is a program executed in conjunction with computer-aided custom VLSI (very large-scale integrated) design in which the circuit layout is subdivided into macros which are represented as shapes in a data base having attributes associated with them but not displayed when the macro is accessed and displayed on a computer display. The invention selects certain of those attributes from selected shapes for display along with the selected shape. In particular, the invention is used with global wiring, that phase in chip physical design in which the wiring connector points of macros ("pins") are interconnected by wires in an appropriate fashion. Macros are represented on a display by a rectilinear shape, such as a rectangle, or a "T" shape, and the pins are represented as small rectangular shapes along the edge thereof. Fig. 1 shows a representative macro 10, including pins 20, as displayed on a computer display. In global wiring, when using automated VLSI chip design systems of this kind, a human being must identify all pins ("associated pins") having common "net" attributes, and then lay wires to connect all associated pins having a particular net identification. Previously, these net attributes were not displayed on the computer display along with the shapes representing the pins. Consequently, the wirer had to examine the detailed information associated with each shape in every macro to locate the net attribute information for all of the pins, and associate that net attribute information to determine which pins to connect together. The present invention automatically goes into the data base containing the macro information, pulls the net attribute information used by the wirer to interconnect the pins, and creates an additional piece of data associated with the pin shape which is a text string comprising the net...