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Device for Reproducible Thermal Contact Using Fluoroptic Thermometer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000059829D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Egitto, FD: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The measurement of silicon wafer temperature in a radiofrequency reactive plasma system typically results in the problems of electrical interference with standard electrical (thermocouple- type) probes, erosion of probe protective sheath materials (e.g., Teflon (E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co.) for optical fiber probes) and irreproducibility of thermal contact to samples. The device described here, when used with a fluoroptic thermometer, built by Luxtron (Fluoroptic Temperature Sensing Mountain View, CA) measures wafer temperature in a radiofrequency reactive plasma system without the above cited problems.

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Device for Reproducible Thermal Contact Using Fluoroptic Thermometer

The measurement of silicon wafer temperature in a radiofrequency reactive plasma system typically results in the problems of electrical interference with standard electrical (thermocouple- type) probes, erosion of probe protective sheath materials (e.g., Teflon (E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co.) for optical fiber probes) and irreproducibility of thermal contact to samples. The device described here, when used with a fluoroptic thermometer, built by Luxtron (Fluoroptic Temperature Sensing Mountain View, CA) measures wafer temperature in a radiofrequency reactive plasma system without the above cited problems.

An aluminum ring 1 has a radial slit 2 to allow spreading for a tight fit against the circumference of the wafer (not shown). A small hole 3, as noted in section B-B of the drawing, is drilled to allow a press fit of the fluoroptic probe (not shown) with the tip of the probe protruding slightly into the inside of the ring 1 and in contact with the side of the wafer. This hole 3 is positioned close to the slit 2 for structural integrity. The counterbore in which the wafer rests has a depth less than the thickness of the wafer to allow good contact between the wafer and any support upon which it must be placed.

Since the temperature sensing tip of the probe is isolated from the plasma by the aluminum ring, the Teflon sheath is protected from erosion. The remainder of the fiber can be protected u...