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Method of Forming a High Frequency Transformer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000059873D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Simi, VM: AUTHOR

Abstract

A high frequency transformer is designed for 100% automated construction and has a very controlled turns ratio with controlled capacitance between windings. A substrate 1 has conductive strips 2 formed therein by standard etching and/or plating techniques. A ferrite core 3 is attached by a spring clip or an adhesive, for example, to the substrate 1, which has the conductive strips 2 insulated from the ferrite core 3 in the area in which the ferrite core 3 is disposed. The ferrite core 3 has a slot 4 formed therein to receive flexible strips 5 and 6 of a transparent plastic having conductive strips therein of substantially the same width as the conductive strips 2 in the substrate 1.

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Method of Forming a High Frequency Transformer

A high frequency transformer is designed for 100% automated construction and has a very controlled turns ratio with controlled capacitance between windings. A substrate 1 has conductive strips 2 formed therein by standard etching and/or plating techniques. A ferrite core 3 is attached by a spring clip or an adhesive, for example, to the substrate 1, which has the conductive strips 2 insulated from the ferrite core 3 in the area in which the ferrite core 3 is disposed. The ferrite core 3 has a slot 4 formed therein to receive flexible strips 5 and 6 of a transparent plastic having conductive strips therein of substantially the same width as the conductive strips 2 in the substrate 1. One suitable example of the flexible strips 5 and 6 is a flexible cable of transparent plastic sold by Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company as SCOTCHLINK. The opposite ends of the flexible strips 5 and 6 have pressure and heat applied thereto to bond the ends of the strips 5 and 6 to the conductive strips 2 in the substrate 1 to form looped windings. The looped windings formed by the conductive strips in the strip 5 and the conductive strips 2 of the substrate 1 constitute the primary winding of the transformer. The looped windings formed by the conductive strips in the strip 6 and the conductive strips 2 in the substrate 1 constitute the secondary winding of the transformer. A ferrite core 7 is positioned over the top of the ferrit...