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Robotic Tool for Locating and Orienting Rigid Terminations on Flexible Objects

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000059890D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Colson, JC: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

A robotic tool is described for installing flexible objects, i.e., cables, hoses, springs, etc., whose termination is rigid and must be oriented properly. This tool surface, shown in Fig. 1, can be conceived as an elliptical funnel which has a cylindrical hole in the bottom of it. The funnel is split into two halves perpendicular to the desired final seating position for the rigid terminations. The hole is sized so that the flexible portion of the object can slide through without binding up. The seat at the bottom of the funnel is designed such that the two halves can be closed on a feature of the rigid termination for the subsequent assembly process. This tool puts less strain on the flexible portion of the object than would in general be applied through manual assembly, thereby assisting in a quality improvement.

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Robotic Tool for Locating and Orienting Rigid Terminations on Flexible Objects

A robotic tool is described for installing flexible objects, i.e., cables, hoses, springs, etc., whose termination is rigid and must be oriented properly. This tool surface, shown in Fig. 1, can be conceived as an elliptical funnel which has a cylindrical hole in the bottom of it. The funnel is split into two halves perpendicular to the desired final seating position for the rigid terminations. The hole is sized so that the flexible portion of the object can slide through without binding up. The seat at the bottom of the funnel is designed such that the two halves can be closed on a feature of the rigid termination for the subsequent assembly process. This tool puts less strain on the flexible portion of the object than would in general be applied through manual assembly, thereby assisting in a quality improvement.

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