Browse Prior Art Database

Distribution of I/O Buffering Task to Intelligent Workstations

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000059922D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fussell, DK: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A host-workstation buffering arrangement is described which provides data transfer efficiency. Traditionally, host computers have managed data buffering for their attached workstations, with the effect that such transfer uses a high communication overhead and performs slowly. With an intelligent workstation, such as an IBM Personal Computer (PC), software in the workstation can manage the buffering of data (for screen display, printer, diskette, etc.), freeing the host from the task. The host performance is increased, and the buffering scheme used by a particular workstation can be tailored to the particular needs of that workstation. In the case of the IBM 5520/PC attachment product, the PC is programmed to accept and manage up to 8 buffer loads transmitted from the 5520 before writing data to the PC I/O devices.

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Distribution of I/O Buffering Task to Intelligent Workstations

A host-workstation buffering arrangement is described which provides data transfer efficiency. Traditionally, host computers have managed data buffering for their attached workstations, with the effect that such transfer uses a high communication overhead and performs slowly. With an intelligent workstation, such as an IBM Personal Computer (PC), software in the workstation can manage the buffering of data (for screen display, printer, diskette, etc.), freeing the host from the task. The host performance is increased, and the buffering scheme used by a particular workstation can be tailored to the particular needs of that workstation. In the case of the IBM 5520/PC attachment product, the PC is programmed to accept and manage up to 8 buffer loads transmitted from the 5520 before writing data to the PC I/O devices. This causes a faster transfer of data, since the normal method of writing each buffer as it is received would cause 8 times as many I/O device accesses.

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