Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Flatpack Preparation Machine

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000059932D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 3 page(s) / 84K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Moretin, LV: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The automatic preparation of flatpacks is achieved in a machine that tins, cleans, forms and trims components of varying body sizes and configurations prior to subsequent mounting to printed circuit cards. The machine can accommodate flatpacks having from 14 to 24 leads. An auto loader 1 (Fig. 1) automatically removes components located in carriers (Fig. 2) from tube-type magazines. The loader device automatically removes the component from a two-piece carrier (Fig. 2) and presents the flatpack to an alignment device which places the component into a transport and pick-up mechanism (not shown). This device transports the component through all process steps required for the complete operation.

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Automatic Flatpack Preparation Machine

The automatic preparation of flatpacks is achieved in a machine that tins, cleans, forms and trims components of varying body sizes and configurations prior to subsequent mounting to printed circuit cards. The machine can accommodate flatpacks having from 14 to 24 leads. An auto loader 1 (Fig. 1) automatically removes components located in carriers (Fig. 2) from tube-type magazines. The loader device automatically removes the component from a two-piece carrier (Fig. 2) and presents the flatpack to an alignment device which places the component into a transport and pick-up mechanism (not shown). This device transports the component through all process steps required for the complete operation. The automatic loader 1 contains a manual override which enables the operator to manually load components, thus bypassing the Automatic Carrier Feeder. A preform station 2 utilizes a forming die to assure that all deflected component leads are returned to a common horizontal plane prior to continuation of the preparation process. Flux stations 3 and 6 consist of static flux reservoirs (approximately 4 oz. capacity). The component is automatically flipped 90 degrees from horizontal by the component transporter when indexed to the flux station. An elevator mechanism (not shown), located above these stations, depresses the transporter (containing the component) to the desired depth to obtain correct lead penetration into the flux. Flux penetration is adjustable within the elevator mechanism at initial machine set up. Solder stations 4 and 7 have a pump-type solder pot with a special solder fountain adapter. Elevator mechanisms are also located above these stations and operate similar to flux stations 3 and 6. Solder penetration depth is also adjustable at these stations. Cleaning stations 9 - 12 have a self-filling cleaning tank utilizing a solvent reservoir. After flux and solder operations, the components are submersed into a cleaning solution at the first cleaning station 9. The solvent is turbulent within the cleaning tank and agitates around the component leads to assure proper cleaning. Upon indexing through the cleaning cycle the transporter is elevated at the last cleaning station 12, thus removing the component from the cleaning tank and presenting it to an air-drying station. This station is an integral part of station 12 and utilizes heated forced air to assure that all solvents are removed from the component prior to continuing processing. There are two video scans performed within the total process to assure proper component location. The first scan 13 is performe...