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Method for Elimination of Two-Second Billing Delay on Outgoing Calls

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000059993D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hoegh, BT: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A two-second billing delay is required by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for devices that answer incoming calls. During these two seconds, no data can be transmitted over the telephone line. If the telephone is taken off-hook to place an outgoing call, the two- second delay is undesirable and unnecessary. The problem is to to comply with the FCC regulation without restricting outgoing calls for two seconds after the telephone line has been taken off-hook. The new method solves this problem by recording the time of the last incoming call (ring-in signal). If a ring-in has occurred within the last eight seconds or a ring-in is in progress, the FCC-required two-second billing delay is invoked. If a ring-in has not occurred within the last eight seconds, then the two-second billing delay is not enforced.

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Method for Elimination of Two-Second Billing Delay on Outgoing Calls

A two-second billing delay is required by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for devices that answer incoming calls. During these two seconds, no data can be transmitted over the telephone line. If the telephone is taken off-hook to place an outgoing call, the two- second delay is undesirable and unnecessary. The problem is to to comply with the FCC regulation without restricting outgoing calls for two seconds after the telephone line has been taken off-hook. The new method solves this problem by recording the time of the last incoming call (ring-in signal). If a ring-in has occurred within the last eight seconds or a ring-in is in progress, the FCC-required two-second billing delay is invoked. If a ring-in has not occurred within the last eight seconds, then the two- second billing delay is not enforced. The check for the time of the last ring-in occurs whenever the answering device has been asked to go off-hook. The device goes off-hook and then checks for the eight second limit. Eight seconds was chosen because the time between ring-in signals can be as long as six seconds. Thus, adding two extra seconds ensures that the two-second billing delay on incoming calls will be enforced even if the telephone line is between rings. This method also eliminates the need for hardware to perform the two- second billing delay.

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