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Character Set Change Minimization When Alternate Character Is From a Proper Subset of the Home Keyboard Character Set

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060011D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gentry, ML: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

In the prior art, operators of text processing systems used engraved keyboards that consisted of a subset of the characters on a Multilingual Graphic (MLG) code page. These were typically 88, 92, or 96 character keyboards and had a corresponding print element. When an operator wanted to access a character that was not on the engraved keyboard, some alternate sequence of keys to access the desired character was employed. Technology has improved such that the keyboard hardware now available on the IBM Personal Computer (PC) and other related products produce more than 96 characters. The PC keyboard on the PC and PC-XT allows the operator to key 256 graphic characters from the PC code page 437.

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Character Set Change Minimization When Alternate Character Is From a Proper Subset of the Home Keyboard Character Set

In the prior art, operators of text processing systems used engraved keyboards that consisted of a subset of the characters on a Multilingual Graphic (MLG) code page. These were typically 88, 92, or 96 character keyboards and had a corresponding print element. When an operator wanted to access a character that was not on the engraved keyboard, some alternate sequence of keys to access the desired character was employed. Technology has improved such that the keyboard hardware now available on the IBM Personal Computer (PC) and other related products produce more than 96 characters. The PC keyboard on the PC and PC-XT allows the operator to key 256 graphic characters from the PC code page 437. To accommodate operators in multilingual applications, the operator must be free to easily access more characters than on the traditional 96-character keyboard. With the advent of economical printers such as the IBM Quietwriter, capable of full code page character sets, the relationship of keyboard identification (id) and print wheel id is no longer needed as the printer does not have to be stopped as often to allow the operator to mount a new character set for the print head. Thus, the concept of the international character set (337) as a home keyboard is proposed. There are two ways to produce those graphic characters that are not physically engraved on the operator's keyboard; the prior- art method of keyboard emulation where the "alt key" combined with A to Z is employed to produce world trade characters, and the PC method of the PC hardware generating one of the 256 characters by the operator entering the numeric ASCII value through the numeric keypad.

In the latter case, the hardware does the translation and returns the same value as if the keyboard had the key actually engraved. For example, some new keyboards on new PC products have many more engraved world trade characters for France than the original PC keyboard. The operator with the new keyboard merely presses the engraved key, whereas the operator with the original PC keyboard pressed a four-key sequence. To DisplayWrite, both operations appear the same as the operating system returns identical information. Thus, the character that was desired by the operator is accepted into...