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Browse Prior Art Database

Magnetically Attracted Flexible Platen

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060024D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Howes, JK: AUTHOR

Abstract

A mechanism is described for automatic head-to-platen gap adjustment for wire matrix printers. An electromagnet is utilized to draw the platen against the paper which is pushed up against a reference plate. The gap between the printhead and platen in wire matrix printers is very important. Small variations in this gap can cause degradation in print quality of paper form and ribbon feed problems. This gap is usually controlled by designing precision parts to locate the printhead and platen with respect to each other. Also, since this gap must be varied in size to accommodate different paper forms thicknesses, either the head or platen must move with respect to the other. This usually involves some type of manual adjustment made by the operator. Such adjustments can be inaccurate and time consuming.

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Magnetically Attracted Flexible Platen

A mechanism is described for automatic head-to-platen gap adjustment for wire matrix printers. An electromagnet is utilized to draw the platen against the paper which is pushed up against a reference plate. The gap between the printhead and platen in wire matrix printers is very important. Small variations in this gap can cause degradation in print quality of paper form and ribbon feed problems. This gap is usually controlled by designing precision parts to locate the printhead and platen with respect to each other. Also, since this gap must be varied in size to accommodate different paper forms thicknesses, either the head or platen must move with respect to the other. This usually involves some type of manual adjustment made by the operator. Such adjustments can be inaccurate and time consuming. In the mechanism disclosed herein the paper is pressed against a reference plate on which the printhead rides through a set of bearings. With this configuration the printing surface of the paper is held a fixed distance from the printhead regardless of the paper form thickness. The force used to hold the paper must be sufficient to prevent any paper motion during printing. It must also provide a foundation stiff enough to absorb the print wire impact without backing away from the reference plate. If these requirements are met, it has been demonstrated that the drag applied to the paper is too great to allow paper forms to be moved...