Browse Prior Art Database

Magnetic Printer Head

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060032D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lean, EG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Magnetic printers have recently attracted considerable interest. The key features are a solid mechanical magnetic drum and a magnetic head (with more than 2000 individual heads) using perpendicular recording. The design, construction, and manufacture of the heads with drivers are essential aspects of magnetic printers. A magnetic printer head is shown in Fig. 1A wherein an array of magnetic coils with high permeability cores having a rectangular surface is used to energize different magnetic dots. A flux-closing pole or shunt with a large area is positioned right next to the dot pattern, as shown in Fig. 1A, to close the magnetic flux from the recording pole through the magnetic medium. Fig. 1B shows a magnetic dot drum made of magnetic pins which is rotated between the magnetic coils and the magnetic recording tape.

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Magnetic Printer Head

Magnetic printers have recently attracted considerable interest. The key features are a solid mechanical magnetic drum and a magnetic head (with more than 2000 individual heads) using perpendicular recording. The design, construction, and manufacture of the heads with drivers are essential aspects of magnetic printers. A magnetic printer head is shown in Fig. 1A wherein an array of magnetic coils with high permeability cores having a rectangular surface is used to energize different magnetic dots. A flux-closing pole or shunt with a large area is positioned right next to the dot pattern, as shown in Fig. 1A, to close the magnetic flux from the recording pole through the magnetic medium. Fig. 1B shows a magnetic dot drum made of magnetic pins which is rotated between the magnetic coils and the magnetic recording tape. The tip of the magnetic pin can be a round dot or elliptical shape with size suitable to the printing resolution requirements. Fig. 2 shows that the other end of the magnetic tip can be rectangular to match the face of the magnetic coil for maximum coupling. The flux-on time is determined by the rotation speed of the drum and the height of the rectangular pole face. As the magnetic dot drum and magnetic printing medium spins at a constant speed, the magnetic coil will be turned on when the proper dot or dots come in front of the coil pole to complete the flux loop and thus to print a dot or dots in the magnetic medium. A row of...