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Automatic Capitalization and Spacing of Sentences

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060053D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cole, AG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Recognition of the indicator for the end of a sentence in continuous voice recognition systems can be followed by an automatic sequence of reviewing for exception situations and, where no exception is found, by the automatic generation of sentence end punctuation, spacing and capitalization of the first word of the following sentence. Consider a word processing system which does not have a "shift" key for capitalizing words. One could determine the capitalization of most words (e.g., "Monday" and "Mr.") by running them through a spelling checker. However, the capitalization of the first word of a sentence would have to be done explicitly by command or by the system. This invention describes how the system would determine when to capitalize a word.

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Automatic Capitalization and Spacing of Sentences

Recognition of the indicator for the end of a sentence in continuous voice recognition systems can be followed by an automatic sequence of reviewing for exception situations and, where no exception is found, by the automatic generation of sentence end punctuation, spacing and capitalization of the first word of the following sentence. Consider a word processing system which does not have a "shift" key for capitalizing words. One could determine the capitalization of most words (e.g., "Monday" and "Mr.") by running them through a spelling checker. However, the capitalization of the first word of a sentence would have to be done explicitly by command or by the system. This invention describes how the system would determine when to capitalize a word. In addition, intersentence spacing (2 spaces) can also be provided automatically. Such spacing is currently done by some editors or formatters, but not dynamically. The novelty of this technique is not in the method of detecting the end of the sentence, but in the use of this information to capitalize the first word of a sentence. The figure shows how a computer processes spoken input. The rules which determine when a sentence begins are based on detection of the end of a sentence. The simplest method of determining the end of a sentence is to recognize a period (.), exclamation point (1/4), or question mark (?) followed by a space. For speech input, a change in the voice intonation, or other verbal indications may also indicate the end of a sentence. A spelling checker can recognize exceptions such as abbreviations "Mr." and "etc." and not treat them as the end of a sentence. The system inserts the second space at the end of a sentence if the user does not....