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Scientific IMSADF Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060071D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Olson, D: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a scientific notation interface for application generators. Information management system application development programs, such as IMSADF II, use an auditor routine to validate input data, perform application logic, and process application data. The auditor uses a symbol dictionary technique to decide which operations are to be performed on specified data. Fields in a user data base are always defined to the application development facility via an offline rules generator program, the purpose of which is to build "rules" which describe the data and transactions to be executed online. During conversational processing, these rules and fields are stored in a specified format in the area of random-access memory designated as the scratch pad area.

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Scientific IMSADF Interface

This article describes a scientific notation interface for application generators. Information management system application development programs, such as IMSADF II, use an auditor routine to validate input data, perform application logic, and process application data. The auditor uses a symbol dictionary technique to decide which operations are to be performed on specified data. Fields in a user data base are always defined to the application development facility via an offline rules generator program, the purpose of which is to build "rules" which describe the data and transactions to be executed online. During conversational processing, these rules and fields are stored in a specified format in the area of random-access memory designated as the scratch pad area. In previous versions of IMSADF, there was no capability to process a field in floating-point format. This imposed a strict limitation upon the size and accuracy of processed fields. If a user data base contained a field in floating-point format, there was no way to retrieve that field and display it in such a way that it was meaningful to the user, or to allow the user to enter a floating-point field from the keyboard in the common scientific notation so that it could be stored in the data base. A new data conversion interface was invented which converts floating-point data to/from alphanumeric data which was displayed on the screen via the application generator. This capabi...