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High-Precision Laser Scanning Microscope

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060153D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Frosch, A: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A laser scanning microscope with submicron spatial resolution is obtained by arranging a glass scale in the intermediate image plane and focussing the scanning beam in that plane. The optical system is illustrated schematically in the cross- sectional views of Figs. 1A and 1B, the latter showing the system rotated by 90Πabout the optical axis. A collimated laser beam 3 exits from optical fiber 2 to be deflected by semitransparent mirror 4 onto scanning device 1, say, a resonant mirror (one-dimensional scanning being sufficient, as object 11 is moved in the other orthogonal direction). The deflected beam 7 (7a, 7b designating two extreme positions) then traverses an optical grating 6 to be split perpendicularly to the scanning direction into three beams 13a to 13c.

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High-Precision Laser Scanning Microscope

A laser scanning microscope with submicron spatial resolution is obtained by arranging a glass scale in the intermediate image plane and focussing the scanning beam in that plane. The optical system is illustrated schematically in the cross- sectional views of Figs. 1A and 1B, the latter showing the system rotated by 90OE about the optical axis. A collimated laser beam 3 exits from optical fiber 2 to be deflected by semitransparent mirror 4 onto scanning device 1, say, a resonant mirror (one-dimensional scanning being sufficient, as object 11 is moved in the other orthogonal direction). The deflected beam 7 (7a, 7b designating two extreme positions) then traverses an optical grating 6 to be split perpendicularly to the scanning direction into three beams 13a to 13c. These beams are focussed by lens 5 onto the intermediate microscope plane 8 where a glass scale 14 is arranged, the longitudinal axis of which extends in Fig. 1A in the drawing plane and in Fig. 1B perpendicularly thereto. Glass scale 14 has openings (marked by hatched lines in Fig. 1C) such that central scanning beam 13b is passed to lenses 9 and 10 to be focussed onto object 11, whereas lateral beams 13a and 13c illuminate the measuring openings 14a and 14c of scale 14 to reach optical fibers 12a to 12d that pick up the beam position signal. The periodical openings 14a and 14c are offset relative to each other by 90OE to increase the accuracy of beam position...