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Diagnostic Electrostatic Discharge Mapping

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060161D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Engelbrecht, JC: AUTHOR

Abstract

A problem with improving a product's electrostatic discharge (ESD) performance is that the paths where the ESD currents flow are not visible to the eye. For example, a high transient current flowing on a shield of a cable between two assemblies in the product might cause a processing failure. The inability to see the current and to try different grounding, shielding, and bead arrangements and observe the effects, all in a short period, e.g., an hour, is a great hindrance. The need to monitor 10-20 points in a product simultaneously as fixes are tried, since a particular fix is liable to help one area while it hurts another, is satisfied by the present arrangement. A circuit that can flash an light-emitting diode (LED) when an transient is sensed is shown above.

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Diagnostic Electrostatic Discharge Mapping

A problem with improving a product's electrostatic discharge (ESD) performance is that the paths where the ESD currents flow are not visible to the eye. For example, a high transient current flowing on a shield of a cable between two assemblies in the product might cause a processing failure. The inability to see the current and to try different grounding, shielding, and bead arrangements and observe the effects, all in a short period, e.g., an hour, is a great hindrance. The need to monitor 10-20 points in a product simultaneously as fixes are tried, since a particular fix is liable to help one area while it hurts another, is satisfied by the present arrangement. A circuit that can flash an light-emitting diode (LED) when an transient is sensed is shown above. The circuit is suitable for showing ESD transients at many points in a product, since the circuit is small, battery powered, and inexpensive. The technique is to simultaneously observe ESD transients at many locales in a product to diagnose relative field strengths within a product and give immediate feedback (e.g., 1 minute) to a person who is trying to find ESD fixes. The circuit is a diode detector followed by current amplifiers to drive an LED. Multiple antennas can be used to sense any combination of electric field and three orthogonal orientations of magnetic field. During a discharge, the antennas A and B inject a voltage onto C1 (30 pF). If the voltage exc...