Browse Prior Art Database

Coin Loader for an Automatic Teller Cartridge

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060180D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rowden, JC: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article relates to two embodiments of a hand-held coin loader for an automated teller cartridge. Generally, coins are loaded or stacked into a cartridge by the cumbersome and time-consuming process of doing it by hand. It is also to be noted that frequent handling of coins by hand may cause skin irritation due to dust and contamination from the coins. The first embodiment is shown in Fig. 1. This embodiment enables a column of coins 1 to be gripped and deposited into a cartridge (Fig. 2) where the coins are stacked vertically. A column of coins 1, either of a specified height or dollar value, may be gripped by squeezing the spring 2-loaded handle 3 which pivots about the point 5, causing an upward movement of the end 6 of the gripper. The device is then inserted into the column of coins.

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Coin Loader for an Automatic Teller Cartridge

This article relates to two embodiments of a hand-held coin loader for an automated teller cartridge. Generally, coins are loaded or stacked into a cartridge by the cumbersome and time-consuming process of doing it by hand. It is also to be noted that frequent handling of coins by hand may cause skin irritation due to dust and contamination from the coins. The first embodiment is shown in Fig. 1. This embodiment enables a column of coins 1 to be gripped and deposited into a cartridge (Fig. 2) where the coins are stacked vertically. A column of coins 1, either of a specified height or dollar value, may be gripped by squeezing the spring 2-loaded handle 3 which pivots about the point 5, causing an upward movement of the end 6 of the gripper. The device is then inserted into the column of coins. When the coins are positioned between the ends 6 and 7 of the gripper, the handle 3 is released and returned to the normal position by the spring 2. The coins may now be transported. The second embodiment is a combination of a coin stacker and coin loader. Fig. 3 shows a coin loader consisting of two tubular-shaped sides 2 and 3 having an open end 4 and hinged about a torsion spring 5 running the length of the coin loader 1. The two tubular sides envelope an area about the size of a particular coin. The height of the sides 2 and 3 may be designed such that the exact dollar amount may be automatically determined based on the heigh...