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Soldered Pin Lighting Technique

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060297D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Grassi, M: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

To provide a consistently reliable inspection of the soldered, pinned surfaces of ceramic substrates, a fluorescent ring light and a polarizing sheet have been placed above the substrate to be inspected. The End of Line/Multi-Process Tool (EOL/MPT) for manufacturing utilizes a video camera to inspect pins that have been inserted into 28 and 24 mm white ceramic substrates and then soldered. The substrates are inspected for bent, oversized, or missing pins. Referring to the figure, a three-inch diameter fluorescent ring light 4 is placed approximately two inches above the pinned surface of the substrate 7. White light passes through a polarizing sheet 5 and floods the pins 8. A tube 3 through the center of the right light prevents light from escaping without passing through the polarizer.

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Soldered Pin Lighting Technique

To provide a consistently reliable inspection of the soldered, pinned surfaces of ceramic substrates, a fluorescent ring light and a polarizing sheet have been placed above the substrate to be inspected. The End of Line/Multi-Process Tool (EOL/MPT) for manufacturing utilizes a video camera to inspect pins that have been inserted into 28 and 24 mm white ceramic substrates and then soldered. The substrates are inspected for bent, oversized, or missing pins. Referring to the figure, a three-inch diameter fluorescent ring light 4 is placed approximately two inches above the pinned surface of the substrate 7. White light passes through a polarizing sheet 5 and floods the pins 8. A tube 3 through the center of the right light prevents light from escaping without passing through the polarizer. The light striking the soldered pins maintains polarization with respect to the source. When light strikes the ceramic, it is scattered and reoriented in a number of different directions. The light reflecting from the substrate and pins passes up toward the camera 1 through a second polarizer 2 oriented 90 degrees with respect to the first. The light reflected from the pins, since it has maintained its original polarization, is filtered out at the second polarizer. Light from the ceramic, however, has changed orientation such that some will pass through the second polarizer. This eliminates any bright spots that might occur due to pointed or misshap...