Browse Prior Art Database

Transceiving Bit Strings From Electrical to Fiber-Optic Media

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060313D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 3 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

George, JD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This invention relates to a method for transceiving bit strings between an electrical and a fiber-optic path, which path having a time-dependent loss. The method steps comprise (a) writing bit string segments into a bit-addressable buffer and (b) modulating an optical source with the contents of preselected bit buffer locations, the number of locations varying inversely with the time-dependent loss. The apparatus implementing the method operates as follows: input data is stored in a register, and then is read M bits at a time into a digital-to-analog converter. The analog signal directly controls an optical source. The receiver receives the analog signal, amplifies it, and uses an analog-to-digital converter to recover the M bits. The M bits are stored in a register.

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Transceiving Bit Strings From Electrical to Fiber-Optic Media

This invention relates to a method for transceiving bit strings between an electrical and a fiber-optic path, which path having a time-dependent loss. The method steps comprise (a) writing bit string segments into a bit-addressable buffer and (b) modulating an optical source with the contents of preselected bit buffer locations, the number of locations varying inversely with the time- dependent loss. The apparatus implementing the method operates as follows: input data is stored in a register, and then is read M bits at a time into a digital-to- analog converter. The analog signal directly controls an optical source. The receiver receives the analog signal, amplifies it, and uses an analog-to-digital converter to recover the M bits. The M bits are stored in a register. When the entire word has been transmitted, the data is available for readout. Referring now to the figures, in Fig. 1 there is shown a block diagram of the transmitter, while Fig. 2 depicts the receiver. Data is received on either a serial (D1) or parallel (D2) data bus or channel. The next serial bit is accepted by the N-bit register 10 under the command (C1) of the control unit 12. (Serial data is received one bit at a time.) When the last bit of the register is completed, the next bit goes to the top of the register. Parallel data (D2) is stored on command (C2) in a buffer register 11 and is held until the transfer command (C3), at which time all N bits are transferred simultaneously from the buffer register 11 to the N-bit register 10. Data transfer commands C1, C2, and C3 are provided by the data transfer control unit 12, which determines the storage location of each bit and the relative timing. Data is read from register 10 M bits (D3) at a time under the control of a segment control and timing unit 13. Accessing the proper M bits of the register 10 is performed by incrementing the address of the M-bit segment. (A shift register may be used if the serial data control uses a roll-around fill sequence.) The M bits are then converted to an analog pulse height (D4) by a digital-to-analog converter 14. The analog signal is then transmitt...