Browse Prior Art Database

Head Tester

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060396D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 3 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schwieters, CR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A head button, which subsequently will be used in a floppy disk drive, is tested by temporarily mounting it in a head holder, and then accurately positioning the head holder relative to a spinning, master floppy magnetic recording disk. The head then transduces a data track on the master disk, and the head's output signal is analyzed to determine if the head has been properly manufactured. The fixture used to accomplish this task is shown in a Fig. 1 side view, with the head holder 10 pivoted to an inoperative, head-load position. Fig. 2 is a top view of the fixture in this position. As best seen in Fig. 2, holder 10 comprises a pair of head-holding arms 11 and 12 which pivot about vertical axes 13 and 14, respectively. Arms 11 and 12 are spring-biased to Fig. 2's open position by way of springs 15 and 16.

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Head Tester

A head button, which subsequently will be used in a floppy disk drive, is tested by temporarily mounting it in a head holder, and then accurately positioning the head holder relative to a spinning, master floppy magnetic recording disk. The head then transduces a data track on the master disk, and the head's output signal is analyzed to determine if the head has been properly manufactured. The fixture used to accomplish this task is shown in a Fig. 1 side view, with the head holder 10 pivoted to an inoperative, head-load position. Fig. 2 is a top view of the fixture in this position. As best seen in Fig. 2, holder 10 comprises a pair of head-holding arms 11 and 12 which pivot about vertical axes 13 and 14, respectively. Arms 11 and 12 are spring-biased to Fig. 2's open position by way of springs 15 and 16. Each arm includes inclined surfaces 17 and 18 which cooperate with a ball-type actuator 19. When pneumatic cylinder 20 is energized, actuator 19 moves toward pivots 13, 14, and arms 11 and 12 move together, to the positions shown in Fig. 4. The construction and arrangement of arms 11 and 12 is best shown in Fig. 5. The head button to be tested is identified by number 21, and its shape is best seen in Fig. 6. Head holder 10 also includes a pair of locating pins 22 and 23 upon which the operator manually places head button 21, while arms 11 and 12 are in their Fig. 2 position, as shown in Fig. 6. This fixture also includes a housing 24 which supports a disk- drive spindle 25. This spindle is adapted to accurately support and locate a master floppy disk 26 (Figs. 3 and 4). This master disk has a circular data track written at the track position which head button 21 occupies in Figs. 3 and 4. In order to move head button 21 from its Figs. 1 and 2 position to its Figs. 3 and 4 position, head-load pneumatic cylinder 27 (Figs. 1 and 3) is energized. The cylinder produces upward, vertical movement of shaft 28, as this shaft slides within stationary cylinder 29. This upward movement stops when shaft-carried stop 30 engages the underside of stationary, two-piece block 31, as seen in Fig. 3. Cylinder 29 includes a two-surface, head-load cam slot 32. Shaft 28 carries a pin 33 which rides in slot 32. During the first part of the aforesai...