Browse Prior Art Database

Diskette Writer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060402D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 75K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chacon, CC: AUTHOR [+7]

Abstract

The two diskette writers of Fig. 1 are used to write selected programs on diskettes 10, as these diskettes are fed, one at a time, from the bottom of a stack of such diskettes. Each diskette carries a blank label of thermally sensitive paper. After the diskette is written, the label is nonimpact printed by a thermal printhead 100 (Fig. 2), to thereby indicate the selected programs which have been written on that particular diskette. In this manner, the diskettes of the stack can each be selectively written and labeled, so that each can, if desired, contain different program data. Fig. 3 is a side view and Fig. 4 is a top view of the hopper which holds a stack of diskettes 10.

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Diskette Writer

The two diskette writers of Fig. 1 are used to write selected programs on diskettes 10, as these diskettes are fed, one at a time, from the bottom of a stack of such diskettes. Each diskette carries a blank label of thermally sensitive paper. After the diskette is written, the label is nonimpact printed by a thermal printhead 100 (Fig. 2), to thereby indicate the selected programs which have been written on that particular diskette. In this manner, the diskettes of the stack can each be selectively written and labeled, so that each can, if desired, contain different program data. Fig. 3 is a side view and Fig. 4 is a top view of the hopper which holds a stack of diskettes 10. Feeder finger 11 reciprocates between its pickup position, in which it is shown, and a staging position 12, where the diskette is left in channel 122 of gate 121, awaiting use by a diskette-writing disk drive 110 of conventional construction. Finger 11 then returns to the pickup position, to await a command to supply another diskette. Movement of the finger is controlled by motor 30, belt 31 and idler pulley 32, as finger 11 rides on rails 35 and 135. Sensors 33 and 34 sense the presence of finger 11 at its two extremities of movement, and motor 30 is controlled accordingly. The stack of diskettes are supported by wire forms 13, the two side ones 113 of which slidably support a weight 14 which biases the stack of diskettes generally downward. Guide plates 15 and 16 (Fig. 4) accurately align the lowermost diskettes of the stack. Plate 15 includes a vertical surface 17 which allows finger 11 to move the lowest diskette in the stack, while preventing movement of the second lowest diskette. When the stack is depleted, a sensor 18 indicates that the hopper is empty. Arrow 20 of Fig. 4 shows symbolicall...