Browse Prior Art Database

Infrared Reflections

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060415D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 3 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bleau, C: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

This article describes utilizing infrared (IR) radiation focused by reflectors for use with diskette manufacturing apparatus, and more particularly with forming the folds in the diskette envelope assembly. The arrangement provides for fine mechanical adjustment. This system provides a quick response as well as the capability of independently programming the radiation intensity and the radiation exposure time. The radiation intensity may be controlled through a range of ten percent to one-hundred percent power (10% to 100%). The time may be set from zero time through ten seconds (0 thru 10 seconds). Contact heating has been used to thermally set the top and side folds of plastic diskette envelopes.

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Infrared Reflections

This article describes utilizing infrared (IR) radiation focused by reflectors for use with diskette manufacturing apparatus, and more particularly with forming the folds in the diskette envelope assembly. The arrangement provides for fine mechanical adjustment. This system provides a quick response as well as the capability of independently programming the radiation intensity and the radiation exposure time. The radiation intensity may be controlled through a range of ten percent to one-hundred percent power (10% to 100%). The time may be set from zero time through ten seconds (0 thru 10 seconds). Contact heating has been used to thermally set the top and side folds of plastic diskette envelopes. This was accomplished by forming the envelope over a flat steel mandrel and then applying pressure against the folded flaps with contoured, silicon faced, electrically heated forming bars. The silicon facing on the forming bar was used to preclude marring or distorting the folded envelope. The apparatus described herein utilizes IR radiant heat as a non- contact heat energy source to thermally set the plastic diskette envelope folds in the automatic side flap fold machine. The plastic material used for the diskette envelope is nearly a black body material. This causes a high percentage of the focused IR energy to be absorbed by the plastic. The IR energy which is absorbed by the plastic causes both the internal and external temperature of the plastic to rise nearly simultaneously. This simultaneous rise in temperature causes a more even heating of the plastic than is possible using a surface conduction-type heating system. A contact heating system is much less efficient than an IR radiation heating system. This is primarily due to poor boundary layer heat transmission from the resistance heater through the metal bar and again through the silicon rubber and finally to the fold of the product. The IR heating applies nearly all of the radiated energy directly to the product fold area. Due to the limited space available in the automatic side flap fold machine, where the product side fold heat set takes place, a non- standard IR reflector system had to be designed for inclusion in the machine. The reflectors are required in this application to precisely focus the radiant heat energy on the 5.25-inch-long side folds, and across the 5.25-inch-long middle fold of the product. This posed a problem, in that "undershine" (not heating the extreme outside edges of the surface) or "overshine" (overheating of the extreme outside edges) would not produce an acceptable product. UNDERSHINE, used in this text, means that the radiation from the IR lamps would not reach the extreme ends of the product. If the heat energy does not reach every point of the folded envelope, the end portions of the envelope will not heat set in the proper configuration. These ends will then tend to resume their original flat shape causing the ends of the env...