Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Multi-Lingual ADF Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060416D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bailey, C: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Information Management System (IMS) applications are controlled by rules that are built for application developers with information the developers provide. Some of the rules contain language-dependent information (screen literals) while others do not. The rules also specify which screens are to be used to accomplish the application. These screens are also language-dependent, containing text and literals that will differ from language to language. In supporting multi-lingual applications with the Application Development Facility (ADF), it is necessary to keep the end user interface the same while keeping the application developer interface as simple as possible. This was done within the framework of ADF rules definition and execution with a combination of techniques.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Multi-Lingual ADF Applications

Information Management System (IMS) applications are controlled by rules that are built for application developers with information the developers provide. Some of the rules contain language-dependent information (screen literals) while others do not. The rules also specify which screens are to be used to accomplish the application. These screens are also language-dependent, containing text and literals that will differ from language to language. In supporting multi-lingual applications with the Application Development Facility (ADF), it is necessary to keep the end user interface the same while keeping the application developer interface as simple as possible. This was done within the framework of ADF rules definition and execution with a combination of techniques. When an end user signs on to an ADF application, their authority to use the application can be verified by a lockword exit. This lockword exit is also used to determine the national language to be used during the execution of the application and to set a code to inform ADF which of the installed languages is to be used. As shown in Fig. 1, ADF then uses this code to control retrieval of messages and usage of standard screens so that they appear in the correct language. All of the rules for an application are accessed using a name that is composed, in part, according to the System Identification (SYSID) of the application. Because some rules contain language-dependent information, this means that all of an application under one SYSID will use one particular language. Parallel applications can be defined, using other SYSIDs, that will execute the same as the base application in the default language. For those rules that do not contain language-dependent information, the rules can be shared between applications by the use...