Browse Prior Art Database

No Feed Mechanism Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060435D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Broockman, EC: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a printer which does not require a power paper feed. A raster-scanning, semiconductor laser is used to print photosensitive paper as an operator physically pulls paper from the printer. Marks along one edge of the paper are detected to synchronize printing with paper movement. The arrangement can be used for small printing jobs, such as printing of customer receipt tapes in retail or grocery stores. Referring to Fig. 1, a strip of photosensitive paper 10 is gripped by an operator and pulled in the direction of arrow 12 when a printing job is to be performed. Printing is performed by intermittently energizing a semiconductor (solid-state) laser 14 under the control of a microprocessor 16.

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No Feed Mechanism Printer

This article describes a printer which does not require a power paper feed. A raster-scanning, semiconductor laser is used to print photosensitive paper as an operator physically pulls paper from the printer. Marks along one edge of the paper are detected to synchronize printing with paper movement. The arrangement can be used for small printing jobs, such as printing of customer receipt tapes in retail or grocery stores. Referring to Fig. 1, a strip of photosensitive paper 10 is gripped by an operator and pulled in the direction of arrow 12 when a printing job is to be performed. Printing is performed by intermittently energizing a semiconductor (solid-state) laser 14 under the control of a microprocessor 16. The output beam from laser 14 is reflected from a stationary mirror 18 and a rotating mirror wheel 20 to scan the paper 10 transversely. Synchronization between printing and paper movement is achieved by using a photodetector 22 to monitor light reflected from the paper 10. Markings on one edge of the strip are detected as a change in reflected light level. Paper position information is applied to microprocessor 16, which controls laser 14 to provide the appropriate printing signals. The paper can be preprinted with bars along one edge to provide paper position information to the microprocessor. Alternatively, a spring-loaded gear 24 can be positioned to emboss the paper web 10 along one edge. Fig. 2 is an enlarged view of the pape...