Browse Prior Art Database

Computerized Call Return Feature

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060486D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 3 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Friskie, CA: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a technique for offering automatic callback services in private automatic branch exchange (PABX)/automatic call distributor (ACD) installations. Such services can be offered to callers of busy called lines, as options to being placed on hold. Essentially, callers are given the option, if calling from a tone keying set, to key in return numbers (not necessarily the number of the set then being used), and such numbers are queued and automatically dialed out when the callee is free and their queue positions are reached.

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Computerized Call Return Feature

This article describes a technique for offering automatic callback services in private automatic branch exchange (PABX)/automatic call distributor (ACD) installations. Such services can be offered to callers of busy called lines, as options to being placed on hold. Essentially, callers are given the option, if calling from a tone keying set, to key in return numbers (not necessarily the number of the set then being used), and such numbers are queued and automatically dialed out when the callee is free and their queue positions are reached. Although there are existing mechanisms which allow a computer to return a telephone call, they do not perform the functions of the technique disclosed herein, namely, the collection of digits with the intent to return a phone call; caller specification of any return number, there being no restriction that the phone used to place the initial call be used for the return call; calculation and announcement of expected queuing delays; the use of expected queuing delays as a threshold for creating a return call; and the intermixing of calls on hold with calls requesting call return in order to preserve first-come, first-serve handling. Referring to the drawings, Fig. 1 is a block diagram of a generalized call return system architecture. The essential elements of the system are incoming call hardware and software shown in the dotted line area 1, call return software and database 2, digit collection hardware and software 3 and call origination hardware and software 4. The system combines existing telephone technology with new software to create a telephony application. Fig. 2A is a flow chart of the present technique for call return invocation, control and set up. Fig. 2B is a flow chart of the call return monitor and return. Incoming hardware and software (e.g., an ACD or a PABX) accepts incoming calls and connects them to the next available operator when one is immediately available; maintains resources for calls electing to stay on hold; connects calls to on hold message and appropriate call return messages and transfers control to the callback feature when the caller invokes the call return feature. The call return software and database are the new programming features. The software accepts control from ACD hardware and software when a customer elects the call return feature. It supervises digit collection and creates the proper links from the hold queue to the call return number. The number entered is filtered to prevent numbers such as 411, 911, etc., from being accepted. In addition, if the call return system cannot absorb phone charges, then long distance return numbers may not be permitted, unless programmed to do so, or bulk leased lines are available. It calculates current queue lengths and expected queue delays. The calculations are based on call duration calculated from adaptive measurements and on queuing theory applied to telephone call arrival behavior. I...