Browse Prior Art Database

Technique for Screening for Infringement of Patents

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060504D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bradley, DJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a technique for screening for infringement of patents, utilizing a program detection method. Normally, detecting patent infringement requires a detailed analysis of the competitive hardware which is a time-consuming process. The technique disclosed herein provides a quick and efficient method for detecting non-infringement of patent claims. If no infringement is detected, no further work is necessary. If infringement is indicated, further analysis is required. In analyzing hardware (i.e., as an example, a personal computer) against a computer-related patent concerned with the interaction of a timer channel and a direct memory access (DMA) channel to refresh dynamic memory, programs A and B, set forth below, test for these devices, used together, to provide refresh as claimed in the patent.

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Technique for Screening for Infringement of Patents

This article describes a technique for screening for infringement of patents, utilizing a program detection method. Normally, detecting patent infringement requires a detailed analysis of the competitive hardware which is a time- consuming process. The technique disclosed herein provides a quick and efficient method for detecting non-infringement of patent claims. If no infringement is detected, no further work is necessary. If infringement is indicated, further analysis is required. In analyzing hardware (i.e., as an example, a personal computer) against a computer-related patent concerned with the interaction of a timer channel and a direct memory access (DMA) channel to refresh dynamic memory, programs A and B, set forth below, test for these devices, used together, to provide refresh as claimed in the patent. Program A turns off the timer and then detects the loss of memory refresh through a parity error. Program B turns off the DMA channel and similarly detects refresh loss. If both programs detect loss of refresh, there is a fair suspicion of patent infringement. A similar approach can be used for other computer patents, such as the reading of graphics characters from the screen. A careful reading of the patent claims is required to make a final determination of patent infringement.

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