Browse Prior Art Database

Component-Placement Method for Surface-Mounted Components

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060530D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Stadler, EE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A (flexible) carrier for surface-mounting electronic components is provided with holes or special transparent areas characterizing the positions of the components. A foil, acting as a light source, transmits light through the "position" holes or the transparent areas of the carrier. A sensor at the opposite side of the component carrier receives the transmitted light, initiating a placement step. This placement method is self-adjusting and compensates for distortions of the component carrier. The sensor is preferably mechanically coupled to the foil, as shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 2 shows a foil collecting the incoming light and transmitting about 75% of it through the foil edges. As the foil is very thin, a very high light density is obtained at the foil edges. Two foils, positioned, for example, rectangularly to each other (Fig.

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Component-Placement Method for Surface-Mounted Components

A (flexible) carrier for surface-mounting electronic components is provided with holes or special transparent areas characterizing the positions of the components. A foil, acting as a light source, transmits light through the "position" holes or the transparent areas of the carrier. A sensor at the opposite side of the component carrier receives the transmitted light, initiating a placement step. This placement method is self-adjusting and compensates for distortions of the component carrier. The sensor is preferably mechanically coupled to the foil, as shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 2 shows a foil collecting the incoming light and transmitting about 75% of it through the foil edges. As the foil is very thin, a very high light density is obtained at the foil edges. Two foils, positioned, for example, rectangularly to each other (Fig. 3), allow full characterization of the component carrier with respect to distortion, which is a major problem with thin flexible carriers. The transparent areas of the component carrier may be holes, such as plated through-holes or clearance holes in the power planes (Fig. 4). Either hole type permits the transmission of light. The plated through-holes can also be used for mounting "pinned" components, whereas clearance holes may be provided if plated through-holes are not feasible. The sensor, fixed to the arm of a robot, receives the transmitted light. Upon receipt of the light signa...