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High-Frequency, Low Cross-Talk Zero-Insertion-Force Connector

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060534D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 85K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gruber, HW: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Two metallized areas (tabs) on the surface of two components are connected by contact springs resting against the tabs at the edge of the component interface. The contact springs are always in close contact with the connected components, so that reference planes can be provided inside the components for impedance control of the connection. The contact springs form an obtuse angle which is reduced to about 90Πwhen the components are connected. The angular change leads to contact wipe. The spring action of the contacts can be produced by the metal of which the contacts consist or by a silicon rubber element to which a flex circuit with etched contacts is attached. A first embodiment of the connectors is shown in Figs. 1 and 2.

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High-Frequency, Low Cross-Talk Zero-Insertion-Force Connector

Two metallized areas (tabs) on the surface of two components are connected by contact springs resting against the tabs at the edge of the component interface. The contact springs are always in close contact with the connected components, so that reference planes can be provided inside the components for impedance control of the connection. The contact springs form an obtuse angle which is reduced to about 90OE when the components are connected. The angular change leads to contact wipe. The spring action of the contacts can be produced by the metal of which the contacts consist or by a silicon rubber element to which a flex circuit with etched contacts is attached. A first embodiment of the connectors is shown in Figs. 1 and 2. Contact is established by forcing the metal springs, welded to a metal section of the dielectric actuator mechanism, against the tabs of components 1 and 2. The legends of Figs. 1 and 2 are self-explanatory. A second embodiment is shown in Fig. 3, whose legend is also self- explanatory. The contact springs are formed by flex circuits attached to a silicon rubber element with a mushroom-shaped edge. The stem of the mushroom structure forms a slide that is actuated for contact-making. The described connectors have the following advantages: 1) The springs are in close contact with the components they connect. The reference plane inside these components is also the reference plane of...