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Microwave Plasma Etching to Remove Coating On Magnetic Recording Disks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060621D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Coburn, JW: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The polymer-based mixture containing magnetic particles which forms the coating on magnetic recording disks can be removed from the disks by microwave plasma etching (MPE). Exposure of fully- cured disk coatings containing Fe2O3 magnetic particles to a gas mixture of carbon- tetrafluoride (CF4) and oxygen (O2) in the presence of a microwave frequency energy source has been shown to rapidly disintegrate the polymer-based coating. After the coating is removed by MPE, the magnetic particles are readily removed from the disk substrate by running water. While in one embodiment of the process the gas includes CF4, it is likely that the complete removal of the coatings can be accomplished by the use of air or pure oxygen at an elevated temperature in the presence of the microwave frequency energy source.

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Microwave Plasma Etching to Remove Coating On Magnetic Recording Disks

The polymer-based mixture containing magnetic particles which forms the coating on magnetic recording disks can be removed from the disks by microwave plasma etching (MPE). Exposure of fully- cured disk coatings containing Fe2O3 magnetic particles to a gas mixture of carbon- tetrafluoride (CF4) and oxygen (O2) in the presence of a microwave frequency energy source has been shown to rapidly disintegrate the polymer-based coating. After the coating is removed by MPE, the magnetic particles are readily removed from the disk substrate by running water. While in one embodiment of the process the gas includes CF4, it is likely that the complete removal of the coatings can be accomplished by the use of air or pure oxygen at an elevated temperature in the presence of the microwave frequency energy source.

Disclosed anonymously.

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