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Photolithographic Patterning of a Colloidal Deposition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060632D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brady, MJ: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Photolithographic patterning of a colloidal deposition is accomplished by combining a technique for selectively patter single layers of colloidal particles using a polymeric flocculant and standard photolithographic processing. With this technique, a substrate is coated with a positive resist, exposed through a mask and developed. The patterned photoresist layer is then spin coated with a thin flocculating agent such as cationic polyacrylamide. A layer onto the polymeric flocculating agent, of the colloidal suspension particles, either metal or insulator, is formed by flooding the substrate with said suspension. The density at which the spheres or particles pack on the substrate surface is determined by the solid concentration of the solution and the amount of time the substrate is immersed in the solution.

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Photolithographic Patterning of a Colloidal Deposition

Photolithographic patterning of a colloidal deposition is accomplished by combining a technique for selectively patter single layers of colloidal particles using a polymeric flocculant and standard photolithographic processing. With this technique, a substrate is coated with a positive resist, exposed through a mask and developed. The patterned photoresist layer is then spin coated with a thin flocculating agent such as cationic polyacrylamide. A layer onto the polymeric flocculating agent, of the colloidal suspension particles, either metal or insulator, is formed by flooding the substrate with said suspension. The density at which the spheres or particles pack on the substrate surface is determined by the solid concentration of the solution and the amount of time the substrate is immersed in the solution. For a given product of time and solid concentrate, thin and thick structures may be fabricated. Using "Lift-Off" technology, the resist is removed and a pattern is left behind on the surface where there was no resist stencil and the structure is complete. By repeating the above process, one can achieve planar structures of insulators and metals or other materials, or construct multi- level layers.

Disclosed anonymously.

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