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Compatible Mouse And Mouseless User Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060650D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Greene, CS: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

By using a compatible interface for mouse and non-mouse (keyboard) users, a mouse can be an optional part of a system configuration without requiring users to learn two different way working.

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Compatible Mouse And Mouseless User Interface

By using a compatible interface for mouse and non-mouse (keyboard) users, a mouse can be an optional part of a system configuration without requiring users to learn two different way working.

It would be desirable to permit a mouse to be an optional part of a system configuration without requiring users to learn two different ways of working with the system.

Using a protocol that can be performed either from a keyboard or with a mouse, the text cursor is moved to the object to be selected and a key or button is pressed to indicate selection. If the active pane is to be scrolled, the text cursor is moved to the border of the active pane and attempts to move it further cause scrolling of the data being displayed.

In a mouseless system, the "Usability" functions are performed from the keyboard using only the text cursor on the display screen. Function keys are defined which move the text cursor from pane to pane within the current window, and between the window and the command bar. Cursor movement within a pane is performed with the Tab, Back Tab, Enter and cursor keys.

When a mouse is added to the system, all of the keyboard- driven functions still work exactly as before, but a second cursor (pointer) not confined by the pane boundaries is added to the screen. The user moves the pointer to a desired location by moving the mouse and then pressing a mouse button. The text cursor moves to the location of the pointer, and t...