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Name Server Based NAMING Algorithms With the Concept of Assigned Prefixes in Distributed Directory Environment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060670D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-08
Document File: 4 page(s) / 18K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bartocci, FD: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Describer here is a comprehensive solution to the problems of assigning unique names to objects in a computer network. The solution enables the assignment of unique names and preserves location independence and user specifiability. This defines a complete solution which preserves uniqueness, location independence, user specifiability, and meaningfulness of names. A name is an identifier that is associated with any entry in a directory. Usually, it is the key that is used to search for objects in a directory (the input search argument). However, if a directory service permits searches on arbitrary fields of a directory, the name may not always be the input search argument. There are two possible approaches to name assignment. The basic difference between the two approaches is the meaning that is attached to names.

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Name Server Based NAMING Algorithms With the Concept of Assigned Prefixes in Distributed Directory Environment

Describer here is a comprehensive solution to the problems of assigning unique names to objects in a computer network. The solution enables the assignment of unique names and preserves location independence and user specifiability. This defines a complete solution which preserves uniqueness, location independence, user specifiability, and meaningfulness of names. A name is an identifier that is associated with any entry in a directory. Usually, it is the key that is used to search for objects in a directory (the input search argument). However, if a directory service permits searches on arbitrary fields of a directory, the name may not always be the input search argument. There are two possible approaches to name assignment. The basic difference between the two approaches is the meaning that is attached to names. The approaches are: l. names refer to physical entities, such as end users or application programs, and
2. names refer, not to the physical entities themselves, but to the attributes associated with these entities. To illustrate both approaches, consider an example of an end user with the name TOM. TOM has several attributes associated with him, such as telephone number, address, VMID, and so on. Each attribute is stored in a different directory type. For example, the directory with type ID Telephone will store TOM's telephone number. The names under which the information is stored in the various directories are what characterize the difference between the two approaches. In the first approach, the same name may appear in directories of different types. In the second approach, names are usually specific to a particular directory type. Some of the major desired properties of names are: Uniqueness - Unambiguous referral to an object, Location Independence - Object mobility without name change, User specifiability - Naming freedom, and Meaningfulness - User friendliness. The goal of the naming function is to satisfy all of the above properties while satisfying the other important directory service criterion. These criterion include: Simplicity - This may imply a possible trade-off against providing all the properties, Flexibility - This permits the function to be tailored to specific environments to support different naming schemes, Performance - Including factors such as bandwidth, storage, and time-delays, and Failure resistance - This is to permit the naming function to operate despite node or link failures. The present structure consists of two parts: a body and a prefix. There is a fundamental semantic difference between the two parts. The body of the name is specific to the user that requests the name. It is sometimes provided by the user himself and is sometimes generated by an automatic name creation routine that will be described later. In the former case, the naming mechanism permits the user complete free...