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Polysiloxane Dielectric for Multi-Level Metal

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060736D
Original Publication Date: 1986-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Clodgo, DJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

By spin application of a hydrolyzed organosilane monomer (e.g., an aqueous solution of 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane) and subsequent heat treatment, an SiO2 film is formed on polyimide. This process economically forms a film on polyimide which is (1) adherent, (2) a good etch stop layer, and (3) resistant to permeation by water vapor. The latter property makes it useful as a final film layer over wiring having an overcoating of polyimide. Adherent films of SiO2 are formed on polyimide by spin applying the hydrolyzed monomer (e.g., A1100) and heat treating at 160 degrees centigrade for 20 minutes on a hot plate. Films ranging in thickness from 0.1 to 1.5 microns are reproducibly formed by controlling dilution and spin speed. Uniform coating is assisted by the addition of a wetting agent.

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Polysiloxane Dielectric for Multi-Level Metal

By spin application of a hydrolyzed organosilane monomer (e.g., an aqueous solution of 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane) and subsequent heat treatment, an SiO2 film is formed on polyimide. This process economically forms a film on polyimide which is (1) adherent, (2) a good etch stop layer, and (3) resistant to permeation by water vapor. The latter property makes it useful as a final film layer over wiring having an overcoating of polyimide. Adherent films of SiO2 are formed on polyimide by spin applying the hydrolyzed monomer (e.g., A1100) and heat treating at 160 degrees centigrade for 20 minutes on a hot plate. Films ranging in thickness from 0.1 to 1.5 microns are reproducibly formed by controlling dilution and spin speed. Uniform coating is assisted by the addition of a wetting agent. The films formed by this method are useful as etch stop layers. For instance, in etching via holes through non-uniform thickness polyimide, it is useful to prevent etching into a lower layer of polyimide (or other organic film). The SiO2 film is very resistant to the oxygen plasma used to etch organics. The SiO2 films formed by this method are also useful as ahermetic topseal on polyimide-coated wiring. The films formed by this method are much less permeable to water vapor than are polyimide films.

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