Browse Prior Art Database

Electronically Conductive Laser Waveguide for 'in Situ' Spectroscopic Study of the Interface Region and Surface of a Rotating Electrode

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060739D
Original Publication Date: 1986-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Arbach, GV: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes an electronically conductive laser waveguide adapted for in situ characterization of intermediates formed during electrochemical reactions. This waveguide works on the basis of total internal reflection, which takes place only if index of refraction of a waveguide layer is larger than its surrounding materials and a laser beam enters the waveguide layer at an angle less than the critical angle of incidence. A schematic of the present arrangement, including a rotating disk electrode 10, is shown in Fig. 1. The electrode 10 has its lower end immersed in electrolyte solution 12 in a container 14 which is transparent to light.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Electronically Conductive Laser Waveguide for 'in Situ' Spectroscopic Study of the Interface Region and Surface of a Rotating Electrode

This article describes an electronically conductive laser waveguide adapted for in situ characterization of intermediates formed during electrochemical reactions. This waveguide works on the basis of total internal reflection, which takes place only if index of refraction of a waveguide layer is larger than its surrounding materials and a laser beam enters the waveguide layer at an angle less than the critical angle of incidence. A schematic of the present arrangement, including a rotating disk electrode 10, is shown in Fig. 1. The electrode 10 has its lower end immersed in electrolyte solution 12 in a container 14 which is transparent to light. Alaser beam 16 is guided by an optical fiber 18 onto a quartz substrate 20 of the rotating disk electrode 10 which is being used to spectroscopically study adsorbed monolayers on a conductive, optically transparent layer 22 of the electrode 10. As can be seen in Fig. 2 which is an enlarged view of the lower portion of the electrode 10, the quartz substrate 20 carries a horizontal waveguide comprising a thin layer 24 of a high index of refraction glass. The index of refraction of the waveguide layer 24 must be higher than the surrounding materials - quartz substrate 20 on one side and solution 12 on the other - in order for total internal reflection to occur. The conductive layer 22 consisting of indium- tin oxide is so thin that its index of refraction does not come into consideration. When the laser beam 16, entering the quartz substrate 20 through the angled part, passes into the waveguide layer 24 at an angle less than the critical angle, it becomes totally reflecti...