Browse Prior Art Database

Pseudo Activation/Deactivation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060782D
Original Publication Date: 1986-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Avery, TM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a technique for enabling several processes in an environment to change multiple state levels all at once. It has particular value for environments that contain multiple processes with multiple sequential states. The technique calls for pseudo commands to be issued when an error condition causes the skip of several states. In such a situation the normal sequential state change is accomplished through the issuance of pseudo commands to get from the initial state to the desired state. In an environment where commands are received that activate and deactivate states of processes sequentially, these commands are received in a specified sequential order that ensures an orderly activation and deactivation.

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Pseudo Activation/Deactivation

This article describes a technique for enabling several processes in an environment to change multiple state levels all at once. It has particular value for environments that contain multiple processes with multiple sequential states. The technique calls for pseudo commands to be issued when an error condition causes the skip of several states. In such a situation the normal sequential state change is accomplished through the issuance of pseudo commands to get from the initial state to the desired state. In an environment where commands are received that activate and deactivate states of processes sequentially, these commands are received in a specified sequential order that ensures an orderly activation and deactivation.

When these commands are not received in an orderly sequential manner, then the processes must skip numerous sequential states to get to the desired state. This is not the normal occurrence, but can and will happen. This technique handles the skipping of the numerous sequential states to get to the desired state. The steps of the method are as follows: 1. A command is received that requires the processes to change states. The initial process determines the state of the processes and whether this command will cause the processes to change to the next sequential state. If this is the case, then the command is processed and the appropriate response sent. 2. If this command will not cause the processes to change to the...