Browse Prior Art Database

Techniques for Fabricating Molded Planar or Three-Dimensional Circuitry

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060799D
Original Publication Date: 1986-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Karr, PC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes improved methods to incorporate customized electronic circuitry into and on molded plastic substrates concurrent with the molding or forming operation. Current state-of-the-art of fabricating injection molded printed wiring boards (PWBs) or substrates is as follows: 1.Mold substrate, 2. Sensitize or print a conductive pattern on the substrate, plate, if necessary, or 3. Add a conductive metal by plating or laminating, and then personalize by a lithographic procedure. The techniques disclosed herein achieve planar or three-dimensional circuitized substrates with extensive process and product possibilities.

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Techniques for Fabricating Molded Planar or Three-Dimensional Circuitry

This article describes improved methods to incorporate customized electronic circuitry into and on molded plastic substrates concurrent with the molding or forming operation. Current state-of-the-art of fabricating injection molded printed wiring boards (PWBs) or substrates is as follows: 1.Mold substrate, 2. Sensitize or print a conductive pattern on the substrate, plate, if necessary, or 3. Add a conductive metal by plating or laminating, and then personalize by a lithographic procedure. The techniques disclosed herein achieve planar or three-dimensional circuitized substrates with extensive process and product possibilities. Personalized circuitry on selected flat carriers (film and sheets) are created by state-of-the-art techniques, such as photolithography of laminated, sputtered, vacuum or otherwise deposited metallurgies, as shown in Fig. 1. This carrier with personalized circuitry is then thermoformed to adesired three-dimensional configuration, as illustrated in Fig. 2 showing top circuitry. The carrier is placed into a mold where it is locked into position held by vacuum, electrostatics or other means. If through-holes are desired, the carrier can be pre-punched and fitted over pins in the mold. These through-holes can be plated by existing printed circuit methods. If pinned substrates are desired, the mold is loaded with pins which, after molding, remain with the part to form circuitized pinned substrates. A carrier can be placed into one or both mold halves to have the molding compound form between both carriers to form atwo-sided circuit configuration with ci...