Browse Prior Art Database

Preemptive Information Insertion Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000060815D
Original Publication Date: 1986-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lebizay, G: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This article describes a technique that permits synchronous data (e.g., voice, video, etc.) and asynchronous data to cohabit a common communication channel or line. Essentially, the transmission of a packet of asynchronous data is interrupted and synchronous data is nested in the packet of asynchronous data. The preemptive insertion of a synchronous data packet for every voice or video conversation on a line during every time period, such as every millisecond, could prove to be a significant performance drain on the line and thus the network. A more effective approach is that a single packet should contain information for several voice conversations. Each voice packet contains n slots, each of which contains either no bytes or a predetermined number of bytes (such as 1 or 2 bytes).

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Preemptive Information Insertion Mechanism

This article describes a technique that permits synchronous data (e.g., voice, video, etc.) and asynchronous data to cohabit a common communication channel or line. Essentially, the transmission of a packet of asynchronous data is interrupted and synchronous data is nested in the packet of asynchronous data. The preemptive insertion of a synchronous data packet for every voice or video conversation on a line during every time period, such as every millisecond, could prove to be a significant performance drain on the line and thus the network. A more effective approach is that a single packet should contain information for several voice conversations. Each voice packet contains n slots, each of which contains either no bytes or a predetermined number of bytes (such as 1 or 2 bytes). A map field in the front of every voice packet contains 1 bit for every slot in the voice packet. The bit indicates which slot, if any, is being used in this packet. To emphasize the point, if no information is to be sent in this packet for a particular voice session, then the map field should so indicate that no slot exists in this packet for that conversation. The voice packet format for this approach is shown in Fig. 1. A communicating stack machine (CSM) is implemented at each node to generate an interrupt protocol which enables the node to insert high priority information. A schematic conceptual representation of a CMS is shown in Fig. 2....